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An Insider's guide to restaurants, wine, spirits and culinary travel

Author Jacqueline Goldstein

by Jacqueline Goldstein
(Westchester, NY)

This has been truly enlightening, Mark. As one who enjoys fine dining in NYC, I've often been put off by the price tags on food and wine. But you've put the business end of things in perspective. Thanks for this.
My husband Zack and I have enjoyed tasting menus in NYC and Paris on our birthdays and other special occasions, and often come away just a little too full. But the most decadent and "fulfilling" of these was at 11 Madison Park in NYC. 10 courses, plus wines. Each too delicious to pass up a single bite or sip. Zack literally had to push me home, because my body wanted to balk at every step. Too too much. Zack is one of the fortunate few who never gains a pound. Not so his wife. Alas, going out to dinner in NYC means beginning a diet the next day.
That said, we enjoyed another birthday dinner recently at Gabriel Kreuther,an Alsatian restaurant in NYC. Wisely, we opted for the prix fixe, and shared an Alsatian Riesling.
My favorite dish was the lobster, but everything was delicious. It's a beautiful place, with the tables far apart. We were given a corner banquet, far from other diners. A lovely night. And now, on to salads, no dressing, thanks very much. And tap water will be fine.

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Feb 23, 2017
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by: Mark

Thanks for your comments, Jacqueline. I envy you at 11 Madison Park, although I find it hard to consume that much food anymore. I've also heard good things about Kreuther---he sounds like a really interesting chef.
Real estate in NYC (and other major markets) was one aspect of the economics that I didn't touch on, and probably should have. If you're paying rent in midtown Manhattan, you need to be assured that every customer will spend a minimum amount of money. Tasting menus are obviously the only way to do that. And of course these meals take at least three or four hours to serve, giving customers the opportunity to consume rivers of expensive wine.

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